Trivento Viognier

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Trivento Viognier

A youthful straw yellow/green appearance,  with a complex aroma of apricots, honey and tropical fruits. The palate is off-dry and quite full with a long elegant finish and good acidity balancing flavours of honeysuckle, mature apple, peach and pear fruit. Serve with pork, poultry or grilled fis... Read More

Quick Facts

  • Country: Argentina
  • Region: Mendoza
  • Vintage: 2013
  • Grape Variety: Viognier
  • ABV: 14%
  • Wine Style: Fruity White
  • Taste: Off Dry
  • Food Match: Indian, Salads, Thai
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Additional Information

A youthful straw yellow/green appearance,  with a complex aroma of apricots, honey and tropical fruits. The palate is off-dry and quite full with a long elegant finish and good acidity balancing flavours of honeysuckle, mature apple, peach and pear fruit. Serve with pork, poultry or grilled fish. and grilled fish.

As the 5th largest wine producing nation in the world Argentina was long renowned for the quantity rather than quality of its wines. Since the 1990s Argentina has benefited enormously from the influx of investment and expertise - seemingly from every famous wine region in the world – combined with modern technology and better vineyard management and winemaking techniques. Apart from a couple of blips - notably the 1998 El Niño and the economic crisis of 2001-2 - it has been a heady rise even if a general unwillingness to reduce yields has meant that its progress has been slower than hoped. Planted with vines by the Spanish colonisers in the mid 16th century, it was the widespread immigration from Italy and Spain in the mid-19th century (and later France) that bestowed Argentina with such an eclectic mix of grape varieties. The country’s trump card has turned out to be the old Bordeaux variety Malbec which, outside of Cahors, has never really made its mark in its French homeland. In Argentina it seems to have found its spiritual home, producing intense, opulent wines with refreshing acidity and increasing sophistication. In the hands of top producers and in increasingly good (and high) single vineyard sites it is yielding some truly fine wines. With its western borderline dominated by the Andes and its 146,000 hectares of vineyards representing 70% of the country’s wine production, Mendoza is Argentina’s biggest and most important wine-growing province.Mendoza’s vineyards are made of 39% red grapes, 21% white grapes and 40% rosé. They are a haven to Old World varieties including Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Tempranillo, Bonarda, Sangiovese, Barbera, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and Chenin Blanc. The province’s signature grape is Malbec.


Trivento was launched in 1996 by Concha y Toro, Chile’s largest wine group. Recognizing that Argentina’s strengths in wine complement those of Chile, Concha y Toro has invested close to US$60 million in the Trivento project. That includes acquiring and planting about 1,300 hectares of vineyards and building wineries equipped with the newest and best of winemaking technology. The three state of the art wineries controlled by Trivento have the capacity to produce 30.1million litres of wine, many of which are aged amongst the 3,414 French and American oak barrels that impart subtle flavours upon the wines made here.

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